Golden Tales Masthead August 2015

President's Message

As many of you know this is the final year that Judi Schillaci will be chairing the Links of Gold Golf Tournament and dinner committee. On behalf of the organization I want to express our deepest gratitude for all Judi’s hard work and leadership. She would be the first to tell you about her core of long-term, loyal supporters who have worked their hearts out, and along with their leader, they too will be stepping down this year. My point is not to neglect the newer members of the team who have played an integral part in the proceedings but these “Long-Service Medalists” will certainly be missed. We thank them all.

However, the best way to thank these dedicated volunteers personally is to go to the website now and just sign up, at least for the dinner. Just last Friday the sponsorships hit the $10,000.00 mark. A great effort by the team, but also by all those individual sponsors and companies that appreciate the wonderful work that Rescue A Golden achieves each year. You are all invested in this mission whether you volunteer, donate or just support us when we gather together.

Our number of golfers for this event increased last year and so it was decided it would be better for all if this year we bought the course out. Therefore, the situation provides another way to show your appreciation of Judi’s team. Many of us do not play golf but we all have at least one or two associates that we can call upon to support this great cause, on a great course. There is still plenty of room for more golfers to compete for some wonderful prizes. Individual phone calls, emails, or a few words at the office can make a difference. Thank you all in advance.

Chris PP Brant
President, RAGofAZ

Just two more weeks till Links of Gold!

pictureDon’t wait another minute to register for golf and/or dinner at our signature fundraising event, the Links of Gold Golf Tournament!  This event is made possible in large part by our generous sponsors led by our Title Sponsor, Sean Lonergan and the good people of GenRx! Click here to see a beautiful slide show of all of our sponsors.

I also want to take this opportunity to thank the dedicated members of our planning committee: Penny Keaton, Judy Smith, Valerie Shaner, Mark Preston, Chris Brant, Margie Karow, Barbara Petronzio, Caren Solberg, Ann Adams, Liz and Denis Bechen, Julie Thompson, and Bob Schillaci.  I especially want to acknowledge two people who will be “retiring” from Links of Gold after this year along with Bob and me – Judy Smith and Penny Keaton.  

Judy has served as our “Raffle Queen” for nearly a decade and is the designer of the dazzling display of raffle baskets that will surely wow you when you see it.  And Penny has been our Tournament Coordinator for many years, ensuring that your experience is smooth sailing from check-in till the last swing on the Pinnacle Course.  We owe them enormous kudos for endless hours of planning, attention to detail, and hard work.  

But for you this is easy!  Just click here to register or purchase a sponsorship (it’s not too late).

When:     Saturday, August 29, 2015  – 1:30 shotgun start, 
                5:30 cash bar yappy hour, 6:30 buffet dinner
Where:    Troon North Golf Club – Pinnacle Course
                10320 E. Dynamite Blvd.
                Scottsdale, AZ 85262


Registration Fees:
Individual Golfer:    $150.00 includes buffet dinner
Foursome:               $500.00 includes buffet dinner
Dinner Only:            $35.00 

If you prefer, you may mail your check payable to RAGofAZ to:
Rescue A Golden of Arizona  ~  PO Box 71987  ~  Phoenix, AZ 85050

Payment must be received by August 22, 2015.


On behalf of the entire Links of Gold Committee, it has been an honor and privilege to serve our organization in this capacity, and we thank you for your generosity and support.  Because it’s all for the love of a Golden . . .

Judi Schillaci, Chairperson
Links of Gold Golf Tournament

Dogs, Desert Toads Don’t Mix 

pictureDid you know that more dogs in Arizona die from toad encounters than from rattlesnake bites?
 
After the first heavy rain that we encountered when we moved to Fountain Hills in 1983 I observed a large toad in our backyard. He was many miles from the major water sources down in the Fountain Lake. I deposited the toad in a bucket and made a trip to the Fountain Hills Lake Park. Our new, found “friend” did not seem too interested in taking a swim.

It was quite a while later that I found out that the toad would have been quite happy to live beneath our backyard and would have only come out after heavy rains. I also found out that once we had Goldens roaming our property the likes of Bufo Toads were not the friendly pets in our midst that I had imagined back in 1983. read more


Mark your Calendar

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Pet Dental Care - It's more important than you think! 

 

Contributed by Sarah Bashaw, DVM
El Dorado Animal Hospital, Fountain Hills, AZ

We all know how important good oral hygiene and dental care is for ourselves, but many pet owners don’t realize that it is equally important in our pets.  Good oral hygiene and regular check-ups are essential in maintaining both oral and physical health, and to prevent pain and infection.

You may wonder if your pet needs dental care at all.  There are some signs you may notice at home. read more

 

Which Foods are Safe to Feed Your Pet…. And which Ones are Not

pictureReprinted from WOOFipedia by the American Kennel Club

Can dogs eats grapes? Absolutely not. Grapes (and raisins) are toxic to dogs, and they should never be allowed to eat them. Why, you ask? Learn more here.

 

 

 

 

 

On the Road Again 

pictureWith Scottie McGowan, Assistant Transport Coordinator

It started with an urgent phone call.  It was a plea from El Paso.  Five Goldens needed homes.
read more

 

 

 

Rainbow Bridge

It is always sad to have to report of those beloved companions who have crossed to the Rainbow Bridge in the past month. CLICK HERE

And CLICK HERE to see a remembrance including those Goldens that have passed over the Rainbow Bridge previously.

We would like to begin acknowledging donations made in the name of companions that have been lost:

Kathleen Villagas made a donation in honor of her girl “Sunny.” 

 

A Tribute to Savannah

pictureShared by Denise McRae

Savannah McRae 6/24/02 – 7/20/15
 
What can I say about Savannah?  We all love our dogs beyond reason and so know our perception of them is colored by this lack of reason.  Savannah burst into my home in approximately June 2003 as a foster.  She was one years old and her former owner had bought her lot of toys, a stylish collar and raised eating bowls but was giving her up because Savannah wouldn’t let her “just sit quietly and read.”  The owner thought Savannah was hyper.  No; she was a puppy.  She was bow-legged, pigeon toed and owned any room she entered.  I was not looking for a second dog; I had a big beautiful boy, Fitz, who I adored.  People came to meet her.  She was too small, she was too red, she just wasn’t quite right. read more


 

What does it mean when a dog licks me?

pictureReprinted from WOOFipedia by the American Kennel Club

Do you ever wonder why your dog might be licking you? Does he smell the food you just ate? Does he want something? Does he just love me? Some of us think they are just kisses! There is a reason why they lick us. Click here to find out what it is.

 

 



 

2016 Hearts of Gold Calendars are here!

pictureThe 2016 Rescue A Golden Calendar is off the press and it is now ready to order online. The Calendar Committee did a magnificent job in producing the 2016 edition. It has some new features that you will enjoy. The photographs of our present and past companions are exquisite. On behalf of the organization I want to thank all those involved in this labor of love.
 
Chris

 

 

 

 

 

Support RAGofAZ just by shopping at Fry’s! 

Fry’s Community Rewards program requires you to re-enroll each year on or after August 1st so that RAGofAZ can continue receiving benefits every time you shop at Fry’s. It’s easy, just click here
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

T-shirts

A new shipment of T-shirts of all sizes has arrived and with Links of Gold Golf Tournament coming up it would be great to see an array of teal on the green and at the buffet dinner. You may purchase them by clicking here.



 

 

Golden Retriever Books 

The sales of autographed copies of the Yellowdog River of Love Golden Retriever books are going well. You can buy them on eBay for $64.00 plus postage or from RAGofAZ for $14.00. Click here to order.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Protect Pets from the Back-to-School Blues

pictureReprinted from Kristen Levine Pet Living at KristenLevine.com

Heading back to school is always an exciting time for families. New teachers, new friends, new routines, new things to learn! But for pets, watching their favorite human playmate run out the door to catch the bus can be “ruff.”

After a summer full of fun, frolic, adventures and non-stop interaction, cats and dogs can become depressed or anxious when suddenly left alone all day. Occasionally, some pets can also develop more extreme behaviors like loud meowing or barking, escape attempts, panting, drooling, and chewing on inappropriate items. 

 

 

Reprinted from Kristen Levine Pet Living at KristenLevine.com

Heading back to school is always an exciting time for families. New teachers, new friends, new routines, new things to learn! But for pets, watching their favorite human playmate run out the door to catch the bus can be “ruff.”

jackandzoesm3img 5822After a summer full of fun, frolic, adventures and non-stop interaction, cats and dogs can become depressed or anxious when suddenly left alone all day. Occasionally, some pets can also develop more extreme behaviors like loud meowing or barking, escape attempts, panting, drooling, and chewing on inappropriate items.

To help ease the transition, try incorporating some of these ideas into your new school routine:

Prep for School

If your child’s classes haven’t begun yet, start preparing your pet now. For a week or two leading up to the first bell, plan some activities away from home. On the first day, stay away for a couple of hours, then gradually increase the time you’re gone.

The Same Old Routine

Pets thrive on routine and a sudden change can be stressful and disorienting. Think about the parts of your pet’s current routine – meals, walks, training – that can stay the same, and try to stick to the established schedule.

New and Improved

For any routines that must be altered, replace them with new ones. For example, if you can no longer walk the dog in the morning because you’re driving your child to school…why not just take your pup along for the ride?

Boredom Busters

Imagine being all alone without anything to do all day long. You can’t even get yourself a snack even though the fridge is right there! After a few days or weeks of this, you might come up with some…ahem…creative ways to entertain yourself. Head boredom off at the pass by leaving your pet with interactive toys that engage his mind and body.

Daycare Days

If your pup is dog-friendly and well socialized, think about taking her to reputable doggie daycare a few times a week. She’ll get lots of physical and mental stimulation, along with plenty of attention from the staff.

Home Run

Not all dogs are social or love to hang out in big groups. And my cats Turdie and Olivia seem to think “kitty camp” is a terrible idea. Luckily, if your pet is a homebody, there are plenty of experienced dog walkers and cat cuddlers who are only too happy to drop by and entertain your furry family member while you’re away.

After School Special

Talk to your children about how much your pets miss them when they’re at school. Encourage them to spend some quality one-on-one time with their special buddy when they get home. This might mean playing together in the back yard, talking to them about what they learned, or curling up on the couch and doing homework or reading out loud with the pet by their side.

New Year, New Responsibilities

Including kids in pet-related chores is a great way to teach compassion and commitment. So with each new school year, give your child a little more responsibility when it comes to your pet. Make sure tasks are age-appropriate so that both kid and critter are set up for success!

Avoid the Dog Pounds

We’ve all heard of the Freshman 15 but what about the Fido 5? Even just one or two extra pounds can have a detrimental effect on your pet’s health. With school in session, chances are he’s not as active as he was during the summer. So take a second look at his diet and adjust meals and treats as necessary.

Class Act

Yes, you can teach an old (or young) dog new tricks! And why should kids have all the back-to-school fun, anyway? Fall is the perfect time to sign your pooch up for a new training class. Depending on where you live, you might find options that range from obedience to agility to canine choreography!

Reprinted from WOOFipedia by the American Kennel Club

Golden LickingAs you might have noticed, dogs just love to lick humans! Why all this licking? Well, the behavior is deeply ingrained in a dog. It’s visible early on, when puppies will lick each other as a way of interacting and of grooming each other. They sometimes lick their moms as a way of asking for some milk. When dogs are in packs, they will lick a dominant dog to ask for permission to eat communal food. So sometimes your dog wants something when he licks you. But there are other reasons for this slobbery behavior. Sometimes your dog just wants your attention. At other times, he might lick you as a way of playing with you (instead of biting you, which is how he plays with other dogs). Some researchers say that licking is just another way that dogs explore their environments.  One thing’s for sure: The more you respond positively to your dog’s licks, the more likely he is to lick you. It sure is one way of getting your attention!

Shared by Denise McRae


Savannah7What can I say about Savannah? We all love our dogs beyond reason and so know our perception of them is colored by this lack of reason. Savannah burst into my home in approximately June 2003 as a foster. She was one years old and her former owner had bought her lot of toys, a stylish collar and raised eating bowls but was giving her up because Savannah wouldn’t let her “just sit quietly and read.” The owner thought Savannah was hyper. No; she was a puppy. She was bow-legged, pigeon toed and owned any room she entered. I was not looking for a second dog; I had a big beautiful boy, Fitz, who I adored. People came to meet her. She was too small, she was too red, she just wasn’t quite right. They all said “what about that one”, pointing to Fitz. No; he’s mine. I started meeting the prospective parents outside. Do you know what it’s like to not invite people into your home in Arizona in the summer? We were dying in the heat and they thought I was hiding something. I was; the big beautiful Golden. Finally, one family said she wasn’t very pretty. With outrage I said “she’s perfect.” And just like that, she was mine. I did clear it with Fitz and promise to love him just as much. Turned out, he couldn’t live without her. She always felt like she belonged, taking Fitz’s toys, food, whatever he had. He never minded and she never thought about it twice.

And she loved to run. I rented a house and Fitz could cross that yard in two bounds; I Savannah4needed a larger yard (although we made great use of the largest dog park in the country, it wasn’t the same.) So I bought the house I live in now just for the yard. The three of us would play ball and the heat would wear me out. So, Fitz and I would come in, and watch Savannah with her ice and water through the big slider. It was Savannah’s yard.

She’s ruled the roost with every dog I’ve fostered. But never in an overt way. Somehow they all let her go out the door first, take the ball that was being tossed. It was unspoken but understood. And then one day two years ago I noticed my other dog, Suzie, wasn’t letting Savannah out of the door first. Odd. Then just before Christmas I felt the lumps. I called Mary, our super Veterinarian and she came to see us. I’d read up on it by then and asked what she thought. Chemo for lymphoma was a reasonable option. Not doing anything was also a reasonable option. We chose action and she loved spending her day getting chemotherapy. Only Savannah.

With all of the big, beautiful, true to confirmation Goldens out there, somehow she was chosen for four photo shoots. It was all in the attitude. Other than the day of surgery (she blew her knee out chasing a ball) and the day I knew she was ready to say good-bye, she never had an unhappy day. She took the sunshine with her wherever she went. That sunshine will light her way to the Rainbow Bridge where I know that Fitz, who loved her the way I do, beyond reason, was waiting for her.


Contributed by Sarah Bashaw, DVM
El Dorado Animal Hospital, Fountain Hills, AZ

Dog with toothbrushWe all know how important good oral hygiene and dental care is for ourselves, but many pet owners don’t realize that it is equally important in our pets. Good oral hygiene and regular check-ups are essential in maintaining both oral and physical health, and to prevent pain and infection.

You may wonder if your pet needs dental care at all. There are some signs you may notice at home. Does your dog have “doggie breath?” Is it unpleasant for you to smell your dog when he’s panting, or is the odor from your cat when she’s grooming strong? These are possible signs of oral disease. Other symptoms might include heavy tartar on molars, bleeding gums or loose teeth. Most pets will not show signs of pain until the disease is very severe. If your pet is already exhibiting signs of pain or difficulty eating the disease process may be very advanced.

The first step in an oral health assessment is a visit to your veterinarian. An oral exam is performed in the exam room with your pet awake. Depending on the temperament of your pet, most of the teeth can be examined, but not all teeth and not every surface can be seen. After the initial assessment, your veterinarian will decide if further action is needed. If disease is detected, an anesthetized oral examination, assessment and treatment are the next step.

Anesthesia is safe in pets, and the side effects and risks are very low. It is required to use anesthesia to safely evaluate all the teeth, perform dental x-rays, and to clean under the gum line. Pets will not hold still like we will in a dental chair! General anesthesia is safest, as it allows protection of the airway with an endotracheal tube, and adjustment of the anesthesia can be easily achieved.

Once your pet’s oral examination is complete and disease is detected, treatment is done during the same anesthetic event. This might be as simple as a thorough cleaning both above and below the gum line, or if disease is severe your pet may require extractions or periodontal surgery. Your pet’s doctor will contact you during the procedure to discuss treatment options and advise you about what treatment needs to be performed.

- Dr. Sarah Bashaw has an interest in veterinary dentistry and has dedicated hours of post-doctoral hands-on and lecture training in the discipline. She recognizes the value to good oral health, and would be happy to discuss any concerns you might have about your pet’s dental care.

 

By Chris Brant, President, RAGofAZ

After the first heavy rain that we encountered when we moved to Fountain Hills in 1983 I observed a large toad in our backyard. He was many miles from the major water sources down in the Fountain Lake. I deposited the toad in a bucket and made a trip to the Fountain Hills Lake Park. Our new, found “friend” did not seem too interested in taking a swim.

It was quite a while later that I found out that the toad would have been quite happy to live beneath our backyard and would have only come out after heavy rains. I also found out that once we had Goldens roaming our property the likes of Bufo Toads were not the friendly pets in our midst that I had Bufo alvarius 1imagined back in 1983.

Dogs are at especial risk from Sonoran Desert (Bufo) Toads and can quickly exhibit potentially fatal symptoms of toad poisoning (excessive salivation or foaming at the mouth, head shaking, red or irritated gums, drunken gait, confusion, weakness or complete collapse, heart arrhythmia, vomiting, diarrhea, and pawing at the mouth). Seizures and death can occur in dogs within 30 minutes from a Sonoran Desert Toad poisoning. Once toad poisoning symptoms appear, emergency veterinary care is needed, but if you observe your dog with a Sonoran Desert Toad, immediate first aid can help prevent toad poisoning from occurring in the first place: Sonoran Desert Toad (Bufo alvarius) http://fireflyforest.net/firefly/2007/08/12/sonoran-desert-toad/.


 

One of our trainers, Jay Smith, is offering Toad Avoidance training classes through October. Please click here for details. 


 

Reprinted from The Fountain Hills Times:

 Dogs Desert Toads dont mix

On the Road Again

 

With Scottie McGowan, Assistant Transport Coordinator


It started with an urgent phone call. It was a plea from El Paso. Five Goldens needed homes.


Connie, the president of our sister rescue, the Golden Retriever Rescue of El Paso (GRREP), needed help with finding homes for 4 dogs in El Paso and one in Las Cruces, NM. It was the signal to alert The Golden Express to get on the road again.Map

There was a flurry of tasks and team interactions as we prepared to receive these Goldens. The Intake Team collected known information; the Placement Team quickly found foster homes; the Vet Team made appointments for anticipated medical care; the Transport Coordinator Team found local transporters to complete the delivery to fosters, I coordinated with Connie and the El Paso transporters and prepared the pile of paperwork. This was all accomplished within a small window of time prior to our leaving Arizona.

Tom and Ginny Williams were eager and ready for their first El Paso transport. In El Tom and Ginny El Paso1Paso, the three of us me at our hotel to discuss strategy for the transport and had a fabulous Texas steak dinner followed by a good night’s rest. We were ready to meet our new Goldens.

The next morning, we met Gracie, Sammy, Buddy, and Eddie who greeted us withEl Paso pups smiles and wagging tails unsuspecting that they were about to embark on a great adventure. Amidst lots of activity, we completed all of the paperwork and loaded the dogs. Gracie, Sammy, and Buddy rode with Tom & Ginny; Eddie rode with me; we began our long journey back to Arizona.

But we had one more pickup to make. We were to pick up a sweet, little blonde girlSkye El Paso Las Cruces with foster named Skye from her foster in Las Cruces, NM. Skye is a special interest girl because she is partially blind and will eventually be fully blind. It was imperative that we quickly get her into her forever home so she could learn her way around before that happens. Skye and her foster bid a teary farewell, she jumped into my dogmobile and met Eddie, and we continued our journey back to Arizona and home.

After one potty and food break, the next stop was my house in Tucson. Humans and canines stretched their legs before continuing the trip up north. Susan Quisenberry was at my house ready to take Skye home with her to foster and to take Buddy to meet up with Chris Brant who delivered him to his foster in Scottsdale. Tom & Ginny, fosters for Sammy and Gracie, continued their journey home. Eddie was staying in Tucson, so I loaded him back in the car and delivered him to his foster.

All have been adopted, but Gracie didn’t stay. Sadly, she was suffering from renal failure among other things and she was in a great deal of pain. We tried to save her but there was nothing we could do. Tom Williams was with her as she was mercifully helped to the Rainbow Bridge. Tom and Ginny were her adopters of record.

There were so many people from many teams scurrying to make this all happen. A special Tail Wag to everyone for helping these Goldens. We couldn’t do it without you.

In the future, we will be making more trips to El Paso to rescue more Goldens. Stay tuned for more adventures of transporters On the Road Again.

If you would like to get into the action and join one of our Golden teams, apply on our website; www.golden-retriever.org.

 

Reprinted from WOOFipedia by the American Kennel Club


 

Can dogs eats grapes? Absolutely not.

Grapes (and raisins) are toxic to dogs, and they should never be allowed to eat them.

GrapesWhy, you ask? Well, veterinarians aren't quite sure. But it has been proven that the fruit can cause kidney failure in dogs—a very serious condition that can be fatal. As little as one grape per pound of body weight is enough to cause an issue in some dogs.

Symptoms of kidney failure include vomiting, excessive drinking, and lethargy. Eventually, urine production halts and tremors start. C

Another weird fact about this toxicity: It occurs in certain dogs (but we’re not sure why some are affected and not others) and has never been seen in cats.

What do you do if your dog eats a grape or raisin? Call your veterinarian immediately sick dogand tell them the amount of grapes your dog ate and how much your dog weighs. If it just happened, they may suggest you bring him in to induce vomiting and offer activated charcoal. A dog demonstrating signs of kidney failure (mentioned above) should be taken to veterinarian right away—more intensive care may be required.

Now learn if dogs can eat apples here.

And see a list of safe vs. unsafe foods for pets here.

 

Reprinted from WOOFipedia by the American Kennel Club


 

Yes, dogs can eat apples. And most love 'em, too.

AppleApples are a great source of vitamin c, fiber, calcium, and phosphorus, and they’re a safe way to satisfy your pet’s sweet tooth (as opposed to chocolate and other doggy diet no-nos).

Two caveats: Do not feed the seeds to your dog as they contain cyanide, a toxic substance. (Some also advise keeping the stem from your pet, too.) Also, like in people, eating too many apples can cause a dog to have a bellyache and diarrhea, so serve them in moderation.

Find out if other foods are safe to feed your pet here.

 

Reprinted from WOOFipedia by the American Kennel Club


 

Food Chart